New Release: Stories from Unlocking Learning Potential —Coming this Summer!

Rounding Cover (496x640)

Back in 2006, this book was released as our first published book!

This story represents many of our clients who struggle with learning to read.

Chris, a middle schooler, shines on the baseball field and with his teammates but struggles with reading. His parents try to work with the teachers in his school but in the end realize they need to take a more personal approach. With the help of other homeschooling families and with a neurodevelopmentalist from ICAN, we read of  Rounding the Bases: Chris Learns to Read. This story presents the model used by most ICAN neurodevelopmentalists in working with their clients.  http://www.icando.org/

This and two new stories will be released this summer as an e-book available through Smashwords, Amazon and our website: www.unlockinglearningpotential.net 

 

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Are Warnings Against RF Radiation Valid?

Brain-Tumor-Report-Cover-Image

 

Dr. Joseph Mercola recently addressed the issue of the dangers of Wireless Technology:

Is Wireless Technology Dooming a Generation to Ill Heath?

Included in his article is a 2016 video of ABC’s Wi-Fried?

While there are studies indicating an association between RF Radiation and Cancer, including Brain and Heart problems, many are not concerned because the studies in their minds have not be replicated.  One problem is that it takes more time for problems to arise. Surviving population in Japan after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki did not show ill effects of the radiation until 40 years later.

My phone states the following in the Legal/Health and Safety section of settings:

“This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.”

In another part of this section, it says of the studies that do show an association that “these studies fail to be replicated.”  They go on to say that the following precautions should be taken:

1. Reduce exposure by reducing time.

2. Use speaker mode or a headset putting more distance between the body and the device.

While we cannot avoid all exposure here are some actions that we can take to protect ourselves and our children:

  1. Do not introduce this technology to infants and young children.
  2. Use the airplane mode as much as possible.
  3. Use wired technology when at all possible.
  4. Turn off router at night, locate it as far from the bedroom as possible.
  5. Use cell phones as far from the body as possible (speaker mode and hands-free devices).
  6. Eliminate the use of microwaves (toaster/convection ovens are a good alternative).
  7. Store devices in a Faraday bag.  http://www.faradaybag.com as much as possible.

 

Throughout the ABC presentation, they made many comparisons to how long it took for the ill effects of tobacco to be well-accepted.  Are we going down that same road with wireless technology?

 

 

 

 

Annual Assessments for Homeschoolers

CFND Pencils LogoBy Maggie Dail, Learning Specialist

 

Many homeschooling parents begin to think about the annual assessments for their children at this time of the year. In around 20 states these tests are required by their homeschool laws. Washington State is one of those and allows for two types – standardized and non-test assessments.

 

  • Standardized tests – While some are administered in online formats, they have traditionally been administered by having the student fill in the bubbles on an answer sheet. They are then normed and standardized meaning that they tell you how your child compares to a representative 99 others. Further, they are to be administered according to set rules and times.
  • Non-test Assessments – In the Washington State homeschool law these are not defined per se, but they are to be administered by a certified teacher currently working in the field of education.  Since the assessments are not defined, qualified test administrators use a variety of measures – some more subjective and others more objective.

 

Whether your state requires annual assessments or not, you can gain valuable information from these experiences. Other than “the homeschool law requires assessments” these may prompt you to have your children tested:

  • Assess a starting point in your homeschooling (given before you begin or early on).   Using the same instrument of assessment before and after provides comparable scores.
  • Assess whether the curriculum, learning styles or methods you are using are helping your child learn.
  • Provide preparation for your child to take college entrance tests in the future.
  • Provide objectives or ideas for study for the next year, semester or month.
  • Provides a “third party” assessment of the academic process
  • Identifies areas that the child may need some additional help.

 

Unlocking Learning Potential provides non-test assessments for homeschoolers in any state via video conferencing:

 

Non-Test Assessment – NTA (qualifies for WA State homeschoolers)

 

  • PIAT-R (Peabody Individual Achievement Test-Revised) Given orally – General Information, Reading Recognition, Reading Comprehension, Math, and Spelling.
  • Optional – evaluation of a one-page writing sample – corrected with criteria that you receive along with an instructional lesson for one area of concern.
  • Neurodevelopmental Screening (auditory and visual processing; dominance).
  • A brief consultation with parents.
  • NTA Report.
  • Fulfills requirement for annual homeschool assessment in Washington State.
  • Standard Price – $60.00
  • Optional: Writing Sample Assessment – $25.00
  • Optional: Learning Style Analysis – $25.00
  • Especially good for younger students and those who have a difficulty in taking tests.
  • Time: About 1 ½ hour for the student and time with the parent to discuss results and answer questions.

 

In addition, diagnostic assessments are available using KeyMath.

 

KeyMath-R serves as a supplement to the Brain Training Assessment or Non-Test Assessment or as a stand-alone diagnostic math test for pre-high school skills. Success for high school math depends on a good foundation.  Cost: $60.00 Time: About 1 ½ to 2 hours.

 

If especially interested in assessing math, but want this to be the annual assessment, spelling and reading can be added.

 

Should you suspect a learning challenge, the annual assessment could be turned into a:

 

Brain Training Assessment – BTA

 

Includes all of the Non-Test Assessment, plus with parent completed forms, the Learning Specialist designs an Individualized Neurodevelopmental Plan (list of activities to stimulate the brain to encourage development) to complete at home with our support.  Cost: $150

 

Depending on the results of the NTA or the BTA and the goals of the parents, families may be offered access to one or more of our professional accounts with Scientific Learning’s Fast ForWord or Reading Assistant, HearBuilder and Sensory Enrichment Therapy.  Also, parents may choose to add Brain Training as ongoing support provided via video conferencing.

 

Another option for determining abilities that need to be developed Unlocking Learning Potential provides Structure of Intellect online assessment, training modules, and support.

 

Structure of Intellect Assessment (SOI)

 

Dr. J.P. Guilford designed an assessment that decreased the attrition rate of dropouts out of pilots during WWII. Drs.  Mary and Robert Meeker further developed this model of assessing and training different learning abilities.

 

Assessment Cost: $150.00

Training Materials and Support: $100.00

 

For more information regarding our services:

 

https://www.unlockinglearningpotential.net/services-1

 

We are currently scheduling through the end of June.

Annual Assessments for Homeschoolers -Maggie Dail, Learning Specialist

 

Important Things Tests Can't Measure

Many homeschooling parents begin to think about the annual assessments for their children at this time of the year. In around 20 states these tests are required by their homeschool laws. Washington State is one of those and allows for two types – standardized and non-test assessments.

  • Standardized tests – While some are administered in online formats, they have traditionally been administered by having the student fill in the bubbles on an answer sheet. They are then normed and standardized meaning that they tell you how your child compares to a representative 99 others. Further, they are to be administered according to set rules and times.
  • Non-test Assessments – In the Washington State homeschool law these are not defined per se, but they are to be administered by a certified teacher currently working in the field of education.  Since the assessments are not defined, qualified test administrators use a variety of measures – some more subjective and others more objective.

Whether your state requires annual assessments or not, you can gain valuable information from these experiences. Other than “the homeschool law requires assessments” these may prompt you to have your children tested:

  • Assess a starting point in your homeschooling (given before you begin or early on).  Using the same instrument of assessment before and after provides comparable scores.
  • Assess whether the curriculum, learning styles or methods you are using are helping your child learn.
  • Provide preparation for your child to take college entrance tests in the future.
  • Provide objectives or ideas for study for the next year, semester or month.
  • Provides a “third party” assessment of academic process
  • Identifies areas that the child may need some additional help.

Unlocking Learning Potential provides non-test assessments for homeschoolers in any state via video conferencing:

Non-Test Assessment – NTA (qualifies for WA State homeschoolers)

  • PIAT-R (Peabody Individual Achievement Test-Revised) Given orally – General Information, Reading Recognition, Reading Comprehension, Math, and Spelling.
  • Optional – evaluation of a one-page writing sample – corrected with criteria that you receive along with an instructional lesson for one area of concern.
  • Neurodevelopmental Screening (auditory and visual processing; dominance).
  • Brief consultation with parents.
  • NTA Report
  • Especially good for younger students and those who have a difficulty in taking tests.
  • Fulfills requirement for annual homeschool assessment in Washington State.
  • Standard Price – $60.00
  • Optional: Writing Sample Assessment – $25.00
  • Optional: Learning Style Analysis – $25.00
  • Time: About 1 ½ hour for the student plus time with the parent to discuss results and answer questions.

In addition, diagnostic assessments are available using KeyMath.

KeyMath-R serves as a supplement to the Brain Training Assessment or Non-Test Assessment or as a stand-alone diagnostic math test for pre-high school skills. Success for high school math depends on a good foundation.  Cost: $60.00  Time: About 1 ½ to 2 hours.

Should you suspect a learning challenge, the annual assessment could be turned into a:

Brain Training Assessment – BTA

Includes all of the Non-Test Assessment, plus with parent completed forms, the Learning Specialist designs an Individualized Neurodevelopmental Plan (list of activities to stimulate the brain to encourage development) to complete at home with our support. Cost: $150

Depending on the results of the NTA or the BTA and the goals of the parents, families may be offered access to one or more of our professional accounts with SpellingCity, HearBuilder, and Sensory Enrichment Therapy.  Also, parents may choose to add Brain Training as ongoing support provided via video conferencing.

Another option for determining abilities that need to be developed Unlocking Learning Potential provides Structure of Intellect online assessment, training modules, and support.

Structure of Intellect Assessment (SOI)

Dr. J.P. Guilford designed an assessment that decreased the attrition rate of dropouts out of pilots during WWII. Drs.  Mary and Robert Meeker further developed this model of assessing and training different learning abilities.

Assessment Cost: $150.00

Training Materials and Support: $100.00

For more information regarding our services:

https://www.unlockinglearningpotential.net/services-1

 

 

Happy New Year from Unlocking Learning Potential / Family Academy Online!

 

Ronnie & Maggie 2016

Along with the rest of the world, we say goodbye to 2017.  Our year brought us many good times and some surprises.

  • In March we took a quick trip to Kansas City with our Pastor and his wife. The highlight was visiting the Spurgeon Library. On Facebook, I shared Spurgeon’s Morning devotionals each day for 365 days!
  • In July we traveled over 3,000 miles to Kentucky for Ronnie’s Smedley family reunion. On the way, we stopped in St. Louis to see a former fellow teacher from ECA  in Madrid, Spain. Afterwards, we visited the Ark Encounter in northern Kentucky. From there we traveled west to Colorado for my 50th high school reunion and my family reunion.
  • We arrived home after that exhausting 13-day trip with the plan on breaking up our family trips and to try and keep them shorter.
  • Also, we rescheduled a trip to Branson (a get-away) from November to January. We are enjoying this COLD get-away right now – staying warm.
  • In May I had taken Ronnie to the ER with shortness of breath. He began a treatment for chronic asthma. So when he had problems that could have been a reaction to that treatment on August 24, we called the pulmonologist who said to continue the treatment and if it got worse to seek emergency care.  At 11:30 p.m. Ronnie had had enough and for the first time ever asked me to call 911.  It is a good thing because he was experiencing a heart attack.  Early on August 25th,  he had an angioplasty where they removed a blood clot and inserted two stents in the same artery.  On the third day, he was released from the hospital.
  • We are researching his new reality and supplementing standard medical care with healthy choices.
  • During the summer our church transitioned from our Pastor of 17 years to another one of our elders becoming Pastor. In his first week as Pastor, he preached the funeral of an infant son born to a young family in our church. On the way to the ER at the end of that first month, our Pastor was wondering if he was about to preach at Ronnie’s funeral. Of course, that could have happened, but God was pleased to continue Ronnie’s life for which I am truly grateful.
  • At the end of September, our new Pastor learned that he had prostate cancer that had metastasized to all of his bones.  Hormonal treatment and surgery done immediately did much to relieve initial cancer. He will begin chemotherapy on January 15. Young men in our church are taking on more responsibilities and preparing to preach on those Sundays when our Pastor is unable to preach.  Prayers for Pastor Trace Foote would be greatly appreciated.
  • Our life has changed to include a series of medical appointments – follow-ups with various specialists and some more routine appointments for me. We have been participating in cardiac-rehab 2-3 times a week as he is allowed to bring a friend for free! This, of course, is good for both of us. I also have joined the “CPAP” club which Ronnie has been a part of for many years. This trip was our first to have two CPAPs and Blood Pressure & Blood sugar monitoring.
  • I am thankful to work from home so that I can continue to serve homeschooling families and, at the same time, be available to help Ronnie as needed.
  • Early in December, I realized that people were not receiving e-mails from me. Troubleshooting on our own, frustrating help from virtual ‘customer-service’ and help from one of our Pastor’s sons, we believe that the problem has been resolved.  So if you have sent e-mails to me and have not received a response, please try again. I have resent some, but since I do not know when the problem started, I do not know if I took care of everyone. STOP the press, since the initial writing of this, I have discovered that some e-mails are still not getting through to Outlook so I will continue to keep an eye on the FA and ANW e-mails from the original source until a permanent solution can be found.
  • Aside from the technical problem discussed above – we have all recently gone through a very busy time. At this time of year, you may be ready for a “new start” for your Individualized Neurodevelopmental Plan, your Sensory Enrichment Therapy, your Structure of Intellect training modules or your homeschooling in general.  Also, you may be starting to think about annual homeschool assessments, Brain Training Assessments or Structure of Intellects assessments.  Upon my return to our regular schedule – the week of January 8 – I will be available for our regular classes and to give you the support you need for any of our services. If you are new, remember that I offer a free 30-minute consultation via video conferencing to help you sort it all out.
  • We have begun to use Facebook as a means to provide ongoing support for our families. We have two pages and a group. If we are already friends with me on Facebook but not a part of our support pages and group, let me know so I can add you.  If we are not Facebook friends but you would like to be a part of this support system please friend me and ask for me to add you:   https://www.facebook.com/maggie.dail.3
  • Contact me at mdail@familyacademy.org or mdail@academynorthwest.net to schedule a time or to ask questions.
  • If you are working with Laura Barnes, our Brain Trainer, please contact her at lauraannbarnes@gmail.com .

Psalm 113:1-3 “Praise the Lord!

Praise, O servants of the Lord,
Praise the name of the Lord!
Blessed be the name of the Lord
From this time forth and forevermore!
From the rising of the sun to its going down
The Lord’s name is to be praised.”

 

 

Reviewing Two Childhood Lessons – Memory and Rewards

1967 - 2016

1967 and 2016

By Maggie Dail

Some Background

In third grade, I failed penmanship and arithmetic. Apparently, the teacher told us that I had passed third grade by the skin of my teeth. Looking over my report cards reveals comments such as, “If Margaret would try she would get better grades.” In seventh grade at the DOD school in Madrid, Spain I was given the choice of moving to class D and get a “C” on my report card or stay in class C and get a “D”. Given my father’s value of high grades, I chose Class D. All of this was before 1975 when Special Education became a legislated part of the public school system. Since my perceptions of these memories indicate that I was trying, I likely would receive special education services if I were in school today.

At church, during high school, I was encouraged to memorize Scriptures to improve academics. So, I began to memorize long passages of Scripture, reciting them at church and at church camps. Also, during high school, my dad offered me $1.00 per “A” I earned on my report card. By the time I was a senior, I was on the High Honor Roll with all “A’s”. My first year of college was a challenge, getting a “D” at mid-term in Psychology. However, by my senior year, I was again able to get all “A’s”. I believe I was still probably working harder for those “A’s” than other students, but I was achieving better grades. Decades later, I want to review these lessons in light of what I have learned about how we learn.

Lesson #1: Memorizing Scriptures Develops Cognitive Skill

Yes, the old adage, “use it or lose it” applies here. When you exercise your brain it develops. Scientific Learning’s motto, “Fit Brains Work Better” reveals how this principle works. According to the neurodevelopmental approach, “Duration, Frequency, and Intensity” present three important ideas. Short, frequent, focused review of whatever is to be learned, locks into one’s brain. Today, I tell my students to put spelling words, vocabulary words, math facts or formulas, memory verses on cards. If they go through these cards between subjects, several times a day, they will learn it. Some need to review longer to get the desired results, but they will learn. Sometimes parents must give the input using these cards. Do all of my students follow my advice? No, I am afraid that it is a hard sell, but I am not going to quit telling them to do it. While this works for anything, when one memorizes Scripture you get an added benefit: Psalm 119:11 Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee.

Lesson #2 – External Rewards Encourage Learning

As a teacher, I would always prefer that students have internal motivation to learn – “for the love of learning.” It would be great for students to be diligent in their studies in order to please God. We can continue to pray and trust God for this. It happens sometimes, but often external rewards are necessary. It may be something as simple as, “Great job!” or a high five or a sticker on a chart. Twenty-first-century students would normally not be motivated by $1.00 per “A” on a report card as I was in the 60s. While a monetary reward may not be the best, it certainly works on the job for adults.

After reviewing these childhood lessons, I see that I need to remember to apply these in my life even today as I continue to learn.

Maggie Dail (Learning Specialist) operates Unlocking Learning Potential from her home in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Maggie’s husband, Ronnie (Manager) and Laura Barnes (Brain Trainer) round out the team. ULP offers online services to homeschooling families. Maggie earned an M.A.in Special Education from Adams State University in 1989 and certification with the International Christian Association of Neurodevelopmentalists in 2007.

http://www.unlockinglearningpotential.net

Check out this video to see how we can help.

Overcoming Learning Challenges – Online Course for Homeschooling Parents

Vera Bill Connie Maggie 1949

As a young student, I struggled with my learning. During elementary school, I failed Arithmetic and Writing. Teachers thought I wasn’t trying!  I thought I was trying!  Yet, my grades and teacher comments told a different story. In those days, teachers pretty much wrote their evaluation on the report cards without worrying about hurting a student’s feelings.

My father had high expectations for me and encouraged me to keep working at it.  Both of my parents motivated me to keep trying. I didn’t have any labels or diagnosis; I was just expected to learn. I did.  By the time I finished high school I had achieved all A’s and Honor Roll. In college, I got a D in a first-semester class, but by the time I graduated I was on Dean’s List. Being on the Honor Roll and Dean’s List or even earning a Master’s degree in Special Education did not mean that learning came easily for me.

All of these academic struggles led me to work with students who struggle. Since 1994 I have been working with homeschooling families. Finding tools to unlock learning potential in students has driven me to where I am today. Working with Family Academy Online as the Director and the Unlocking Learning Potential as the Learning Specialist I work with families who homeschool and those whose children face learning challenges.

Today we know more about how children develop and learn. This understanding guides us in helping our children overcome learning challenges.  In our work, we offer a variety of services that fit the needs of different families.  We think of these services as Keys on our keyring in our mission of Unlocking Learning Challenges. One of these keys is an online course for parents whose mission it is to help their children in Overcoming Learning Challenges.

 

For more information watch this video:

Visit our website:  http://www.unlockinglearningpotential.net

How Research Leads to Solutions for Struggling Learners

Have you or a loved one received a diagnosis of “developmental dyslexia” or “dyslexia”? Have you or a loved one struggled with learning to read – no matter what methods and curricula have been used? Research leads us to more answers to our questions and more solutions for those who struggle.

Image result for images of books and reading

How would you feel knowing your student would have more tools to succeed in life? What would it be like for him to learn fascinating information on his own? What would it be like to be carried off to a faraway time and place by reading a great story?

While many have considered dyslexia to be a combination of two deficits, the more current view, based on new research, providers believe that multiple deficits contribute to a diagnosis of “developmental dyslexia” will prove more helpful in helping those who struggle with reading.  Belief that “weaknesses in either the visual (rapid automatized naming -RAN) or the auditory (phonological awareness-PA) can cause dyslexia has led teachers to address these two areas.  Those with both deficits experienced severe difficulties in reading. (Wolf in Journal of Educational Psychology, 1999)

Now, more and more look to these areas and some additional areas: genetics, environmental, and perceptive/cognitive differences.  With the use of fMRIs we can see what is going on inside the human brain.  In a recent webinar, neuroscientist, Dr. Martha Burns, reported new research that confirms how these factors interact to present different kinds and degrees of learning challenges.

Image result for images - brain scans

Not surprisingly the research shows that reading and language share specific parts of the brain that includes both the visual and auditory areas. While searching for the cause and effect relationship within genetic factors, researchers learned that the brain of an infant show signs of genetic causes of learning challenges discovered later. In 2017, Gaab published findings that 50% of children with a sibling or parent with dyslexia were likely to also receive a diagnosis. This number rose to 68% in identical twins.

Finding the underlying cause leads us to specific strategies for the individual since all of these factors combine in different ways.  At Unlocking Learning Potential / Family Academy Online we address reading challenges using the neurodevelopmental approach ( www.unlockinglearningpotential.net) as well as with Scientific Learning’s Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant. Dr. Martha Burns, of Scientific Learning, says that Scientific Learning programs paired with an effective curriculum provide the best outcome for our children.

My name is Z.C. I began working with the learning specialist at Unlocking Learning Potential in 2009. By 2011 I could see how I had grown tremendously with my education and learning.  With the neurodevelopmental evaluation, I found out that I was far below my grade level academically. At first, I thought the activities were silly, futile and would not work, but as I kept doing them I started noticing the big differences in every area of my learning. I could read faster, comprehend more, my vocabulary increased, and my memory improved.” Z.C. graduated from high school in 2011.

Watch this video to learn more about these scientifically based solutions to learning challenges. Plus, learn how you can unlock your child’s learning and reading abilities.

https://youtu.be/5BmNPJ9KdSo

3 Ways to Help Students Achieve Success in Reading and Language

reading

Do you wonder why your student struggles with reading? I have spent much of my forty years of teach searching for ways to help student learn. Teaching reading has consumed most of those efforts. As you probably realize, many of our students today are missing developmental pieces and cognitive skills.

I have found that children are so very different and learning challenges do not always respond to the same interventions. However, educators across the country help students achieve success in reading and language using two Scientific Learning programs: Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant

These programs provide us with 3 ways to help our students:

  1. Build students’ cognitive skills. Cognitive (learning) skills addressed by Fast ForWord products:  memory, attention, processing rate and sequencing  Reading Skills addressed: phonological & phonemic (sound) awareness, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, decoding (sound out words), working memory (remembering long enough to do something with), syntax and grammar (structure of our language)

2. Prepare students’ brains to hear English. Once we fill in the missing pieces of development in the brain, a child can read and use the English language.

3.      Have students practice reading aloud, with support. Finally, we can provide opportunity for the children to read aloud – to other people and with Reading Assistant to the computer which provides timely correction.

You can read a blogger / inservice provider’s experience:  3 Ways to Help Struggling Readers and English Language Learners http://inservice.ascd.org/3-ways-to-help-struggling-readers-and-english-language-learners/

Over 250 studies show that Fast ForWord and Reading Assistance provides all of this for children across the country. www.scientificlearning.com/results

To learn how more about Fast ForWord  / Reading Assistant and how we use it with our students watch this video:  https://youtu.be/5BmNPJ9KdSo   Be sure and watch to the end for the special offers.

Unlocking Math: Choosing Elementary Math Curriculum

math-lesson-plans (1)

            Many homeschooling families use annual assessments to guide you in choosing curriculum for the next year. As you begin your search for a math curriculum that works for your elementary aged child, you need to remember that there are three areas of math to cover: facts, computation and concepts. If math has already become a struggle for your child, then you will especially want to break math down into these three areas. Spread math over the course of the day with short sessions covering these areas in separate sessions.

1. Math Facts – Math facts are primarily a function of auditory memory so be sure you present this new information to your child auditorily as well visually. Whether you have a full math curriculum or find materials that cover the different parts, you must include this in your child’s day.

My Best Recommendation for Learning Math FactsRapid Recall System

 

 

2. Math Computation – At a different time of the day work on computation skills. Computation is primarily a function of visual memory so I recommend 75% visual instruction. That is you do three problems for your child as he watches. You say only a few words to identify steps as you go along. Then your child does the fourth one. Repeat for the duration of the session of say, 10 minutes. You start with simple addition and work up to long division, fractions etc. If the child doesn’t remember a math fact, tell them so that the process of computation is learned without interruption. You work on the math facts during a separate time. You can get the computation problems from any math book, but if you just want to pay for the computation problems, get a book that has only those problems in it.

My Best Recommenation for Learning Math Computation: Straight Forward Math and Keys to Fractions (Decimals, Percents, Measurement)

3. 3. Math Concepts – The first two items are the nuts and bolts of math. Concepts are how the basics are applied to real life. If you want a regular curriculum, look into Math U See, Singapore Math and Right Start Mathematics. They cover the whole spectrum of math in a fresh way, but it makes it harder to separate out the three parts and concentrate on one at a time. There are a host of math games available that apply these math concepts in an interesting way. You can spend big bucks. Perhaps a better way is a book of games that you can play as a family. My best recommendation is actually a series of books, but the original is the best overall for K-8 math games. Family Math arranges the games in sections according to the different math concepts. Each game has an objective, instructions and sometimes a page that serves as a game board. You may need to add some household items for game pieces. Each game is labeled for one or more of the three age groups within K-8.

 

My Best Recommendation for Learning Math Concepts: Family Math

https://www.amazon.com/Family-Math-Equals-Jean-Stenmark/dp/0912511060

Bonus Recommendation for Mental Math / Auditory Skills: The Verbal Math Lesson Level 1 and 2 for early learners or those who struggle. http://www.mathlesson.com/

For some learners, Life of Fred provides math instruction in a story format.

https://www.amazon.com/Life-Fred-Elementary-Complete-Book/dp/3384111117

Since math skills build on each other, home educators find it helpful to use a “Scope and Sequence” for navigating through math. Downloadable lists of skills can be found on the Internet. By including math facts, computation and concepts you can prepare your children for Algebra, Geometry and beyond.