How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 9)

A Book Review: Younger Brains, Sharper Brains by Eric R. Braverman, M.D.

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

The Four Types of Memory

Many divide memory differently, but take a look at Braverman’s memory. From his perspective there are four with each one ruled by one of the four brain chemicals.

  1. Verbal (auditory) memory –
    1. Needed for: decoding sounds, words, sentences, and stories.
    2. The ability to absorb and retain auditory input.
    3. Found in the temporal lobes.
    4. GABA found here.
  2. Visual memory –
    1. The ability to absorb and retain visual input.
    2. Includes – faces, shapes, designs, surroundings, pictures and symbols
    3. Found in the occipital lobes.
  3. Immediate memory –
    1. Short term – only 30 seconds
    2. Visual and verbal
    3. Can’t remember recent, but still can remember remote past.
    4. Found in the parietal lobes.
    5. Ruled by acetylcholine.
  4. Working memory-
    1. Most important form
    2. Ability to absorb, retain and associate with previously learned information.
    3. Generally found high in intuitive and introverted people.

Long Term Memory Correlates with Working Memory

  • Absorbing and retaining information leads to storing long term
  • Working memory also critical for executive function
  • Executive function – central organization function of brain
  • Frontal lobes regulated by dopamine, handle motor control, concentration, problem-solving skills, planning, retention, — functions of working memory.
  • Working memory puts past, present, and future together p. 53-54

Next time we will continue to address Memory, including Vision and Daily Living Activities.

 

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How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 8)

A Book Review: Younger Brains, Sharper Brains by Eric R. Braverman, M.D.

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

Chapter 4 – Identifying Memory Problems

Memory is:

  • Central to the entire function of the brain
  • Memory problems occur (typically) when there is a loss in processing speed
  • Related to the loss of Acetylcholine
  • Acetylcholine regulates the processing of sensory input
  • Acetylcholine regulates the ability to access stored information p. 48

People with high Acetylcholine are:

  • Creative
  • Keenly aware of surroundings
  • Able to keep lifelong friends
  • Intelligent
  • Understand other people and their motivations
  • Excellent students
  • Witty
  • Enjoyable to be with p.48

Having too much acetylcholine the brain speed is so fast that you are burning it up. Having too little a person slows physically, mentally and emotionally. We naturally lose this important brain chemical as we age. P. 48

It begins with a general absentmindedness and proceeds with:

  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Agitation
  • Apathy
  • Attention difficulties
  • Difficulty driving
  • Disorientation
  • Easy frustration
  • Excessive and inappropriate flirtation
  • Explosive spells of anger
  • Falling
  • Fearfulness
  • Impulsivity
  • Inconsistency
  • Insomnia
  • Irrational decision making
  • Neglect of household chores
  • Neglect of self-care
  • Restlessness
  • Social withdrawal
  • Suspiciousness
  • Trouble understanding the spoken and written language
  • Wandering p. 50

“When you think faster, you can react more effectively to everyday situations.” P. 51

What are the four types of memory?  You may be surprised how Braverman defines these four types.  Next time.

How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 6)

A Book Review: Younger Brains, Sharper Brains by Eric R. Braverman, M.D.

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

Chapter 3 – Identifying Personality and Mood Changes

Personality and mood changes represent early warning signs of pre-MCI and MCI (mild cognitive impairment). Early signs include:

  • Feeling off
  • Feeling not like yourself
  • Anxiety
  • Followed by other mental health problems
  • Insomnia
  • Brain fog
  • Depression
  • Inability to get things done
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Overall confusion
  • Mental slowness
  • Irritable
  • Restless
  • Forgetful

 

These signs reflect unstable dopamine levels. Researchers “at the University of Minho in Portugal found that chronically stressed rats lost their cunning and instead resorted to familiar routines and rote responses, like compulsively pressing a bar for food pellets even though they weren’t hungry.” “..the dopamine regions associated (of the brain) with executive function  — had shriveled, while GABA sectors linked to habit formation had expanded. The chronically stressed rats were no longer producing more dopamine; in fact, they were producing less. …they had cognitively conditioned themselves to ‘go through the motions’ of life, repeatedly doing the same tasks over and over instead of trying something new.” P. 33

 Dr. Daniel Amen states that “long-term exposure to stress hormones like cortisol has been found to kill cells in the hippocampus involved with memory, learning, and emotion. In fact, people who are chronically stressed have smaller hippocampal regions, which may result in an ability to continue learning as they age.” (Highlighted box p. 34)

Having stabilized amounts of GABA keeps the brain in balance. Individuals with a GABA imbalance may:

  • Develop chronic pain or a feeling of being sick
  • Have difficulty with concentrate
  • Have global memory problems
  • Be impulsive
  • Have difficulty thinking clearly
  • Have inconsistent attention problems
  • Be irritable and / or hostile
  • Have poor memory
  • Be restless p. 34

Glutamate-GABA Relationship –they balance each other:

“Glutamate excites cells to higher states of activity so that they can receive and process information… Every time we learn something new, glutamate is released. And every time glutamate is released, GABA must be there to funnel it in the right direction.” P. 25 When GABA is unbalance, too much glutamate is released and the opposite happens – neurons are killed.

Ways to Reduce Stress

  • Laugh
  • Get out in the sun
  • Reminisce
  • Clean-up (declutter) p.37

Next time we will discuss the important Sleep Factor.

How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 5)

A Book Review: Younger Brains, Sharper Brains by Eric R. Braverman, M.D.

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

 

Chapter 2: The Causes of Cognitive Decline

“The difference between a resourceful mind and senility is only 100 milliseconds of brain speed. We react to light in 50 milliseconds, recognize sound in 100 milliseconds, and think in 300 milliseconds. By the time we slow down to 400 milliseconds, we can no longer process logical thought.” p. 23

We lose 7-10 milliseconds each decade just due to age.  It happens so slowly and gradually, that we seldom notice it.

“While we can’t recognize a change in brain speed, many people know that something has changed with their thinking.” p. 24  Many of us describe it as “brain fog.”

Three Kinds of MCI (illustration p. 24)

Amestic – memory loss, increased forgetfulness

Non-amestic – single domain – loss of one aspect of cognitive functioning, without forgetfulness


Non-amestic – multiple domain– loss of many aspects of cognitive functioning, without forgetfulness

Beyond loss of memory there is a separation between thinking and doing. All of this unbalances the brain.

Causes of MCI (p. 25-31)

  • Aging — number 1 cause
  • Addiction (related to dopamine and can include alcohol, drugs, overeating, gambling)
  • Prescription medicines (may cause brain fog, blur vision, increase fatigue, affect depth perception)
  • Over-the-Counter medicines (allergy and cold; heartburn)
  • Parasites, bacteria and viral infections (HIV, TB, Epstein- Barr, Lyme, CMV)
  • Degenerative disorders (MS, ALS, Huntington’s,etc.)
  • Physical trauma – (repeated injuries, 20-30 year old injuries)
  • Psychiatric disorders (anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, panic attacks)
  • Sleep disturbances (insomnia, others)
  • Toxic exposure (aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury)
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies (B1, B3, B6, B12, nicotinic acid, zinc)

According to researchers at University of California, San Diego, Medical Center….”The rate at which the sense of smell is lost may predict how rapidly cognitive functioning is lost.” (boxed text p. 29)

Next we will discuss changes in mood and personality.

How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 4)

A Book Review: Younger Brain, Sharper Mind

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

 

Dementia and Alzheimer’s: The End of the Line

“…the degree of cognitive impairment at baseline seems to dictate the severity of dementia later in life. This means that the longer you wait to reverse your cognitive decline, the more difficult it will become, and the more likely you will suffer from debilitating dementia.” p. 18-19

Symptoms of Declining Attention Are Linked to Declining Brain Chemicals (illustration p. 18)

  • Inconsistent attention, losing items – dopamine
  • Carelessness, lack of attention – Acetylcholine
  • Impulsivity – GABA
  • Inability to grasp concepts quickly – Serotonin

“Not all people who experience pre-MCI and MCI will eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease or dementia; however, everyone with Alzheimer’s begins with the two earlier stages.” p. 19

Alzheimer’s damages and kills brain, virtually ending neurogenesis.  Secondly, brain fibers tangle and finally, there is a decrease in blood flow in the brain. P. 19-20

Symptoms of Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease: p. 20

  • Verbal memory loss (telling the same story, asking the same question..
  • Unfamiliarity with daily tasks (dressing, preparing a simple meal)
  • Dysphasia – (can’t think of right word)
  • Confusing “where” and “when” – not knowing where you are; not knowing the date
  • Confusing locations of familiar places (getting lost)
  • Compromised judgement (making bad decisions)
  • Decreased awareness of personal hygiene
  • Difficulty with abstract thinking (distinguishing objects of similar sizes)
  • Placing objects in unsuitable places (purse in garbage, shoes in fridge)
  • Extreme mood changes (joy to sadness; extreme anger for no reason)
  • Personality adjustments
  • Lack of interest: avoidance behavior; increased thoughts of death, loss of spontaneity

Next time we will explore the causes of Cognitive Decline….

 

 

How Does the Brain Affect Our Lives? (Part 3)

by Maggie Dail, M.A., Learning Specialist

The Life Cycle of Memory – p. 12-13

  1. “Spark of Life” – fetus – brain voltage – 4-5 times that of an adult; but speed is slower – can’t retain all.
  2. “Infantile Amnesia” – birth to four years old – “Infants and toddlers can’t organize their thoughts or recall information.” p. 12
  3. “Memory Retention” – ages 5-12 and 13-20 – blasts off during adolescence
  4. “Consolidation of Adulthood” – ages 20-40 “The brain organizes itself to function more effectively, and we are at our peak performance. This is the time when people tend to establish their careers, start families, and generally settle down.”
  5. Slow, but steady decline – Women beginning as early as age 40; Men usually have another 10 years before this decline begins.

“Each decade thereafter, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) begins as brain speed and voltage are lost.” p. 13

The Continuum of Alzheimer’s Disease – as cognitive function declines and as years go by:  preclinical, MCI and then Alzheimer’s Disease (Illustration on p. 15)

Warning Signs of Mild Cognitive Impairment:(p. 15-16)

  • Remembers past, but not recent events
  • Emotional – agitation, anger, anxiety, depression, fear of being alone, frustration, jealousy, loss of normal emotional response, mood swings, paranoia, tension…
  • Changes in attention and concentration
  • Commission errors (eg. jumping the gun)
  • Omission errors (eg. missed stop signs)
  • Complex attention errors (eg. can’t pull it together)
  • Declining spatial perception
  • Decreased creativity
  • Difficulty learning new tasks
  • Difficulty retaining new information
  • Difficulty with making decisions
  • Failure to recognize people
  • Forgetfulness
  • Hoarding
  • Inability to complete a task
  • Inability to manage finances
  • Memory loss
  • Poor abstract thinking
  • Poor judgement
  • Self neglect
  • Slow response time
  • Stunted intellectual growth
  • Unusual sleep patterns, or general lack of sleep

Watch for changes in personality, temperament,  memory, attention and focus.

If you are like me, you are anxious to get to the part of the book that provides solutions, but we must be patient and get the preliminary information first. Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Are Warnings Against RF Radiation Valid?

Brain-Tumor-Report-Cover-Image

 

Dr. Joseph Mercola recently addressed the issue of the dangers of Wireless Technology:

Is Wireless Technology Dooming a Generation to Ill Heath?

Included in his article is a 2016 video of ABC’s Wi-Fried?

While there are studies indicating an association between RF Radiation and Cancer, including Brain and Heart problems, many are not concerned because the studies in their minds have not be replicated.  One problem is that it takes more time for problems to arise. Surviving population in Japan after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki did not show ill effects of the radiation until 40 years later.

My phone states the following in the Legal/Health and Safety section of settings:

“This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.”

In another part of this section, it says of the studies that do show an association that “these studies fail to be replicated.”  They go on to say that the following precautions should be taken:

1. Reduce exposure by reducing time.

2. Use speaker mode or a headset putting more distance between the body and the device.

While we cannot avoid all exposure here are some actions that we can take to protect ourselves and our children:

  1. Do not introduce this technology to infants and young children.
  2. Use the airplane mode as much as possible.
  3. Use wired technology when at all possible.
  4. Turn off router at night, locate it as far from the bedroom as possible.
  5. Use cell phones as far from the body as possible (speaker mode and hands-free devices).
  6. Eliminate the use of microwaves (toaster/convection ovens are a good alternative).
  7. Store devices in a Faraday bag.  http://www.faradaybag.com as much as possible.

 

Throughout the ABC presentation, they made many comparisons to how long it took for the ill effects of tobacco to be well-accepted.  Are we going down that same road with wireless technology?

 

 

 

 

A Book Review: The Calcium Lie II – What Your Doctor Still Doesn’t Know

The Calcium Lie

 

            In 2008, the authors published the first edition, The Calcium Lie – What Your Doctor Doesn’t Know Could Kill You. Then in 2013, they updated the information in The Calcium Lie II – What Your Doctor Still Doesn’t Know. In this review we will look at the revised edition.

            Dr. Robert Thompson, MD who maintains a medical practice in Alaska, at one time did not know what he lays out in this book. He, like most well-meaning health professionals, treated patients according to what he had learned in medical school for many years. Kathleen Barnes, a health journalist and author, lives in North Carolina. Dr. Thompson says that Kathleen helps him communicate in terms that his readers will understand.

This reviewer has administered numerous homeschool assessments over the years in which the General Information section of the tool she uses includes a question: “What mineral is most necessary to make bones hard?” Many have answered correctly, according to what they have learned and according to the assessment tool, “Calcium.”

Our authors would have us remember that the exam that determines whether a patient has osteoporosis or its precursor, osteopenia is the dexa MINERAL bone scan test. This name should help us remember that bones are made up of many minerals, one of which is calcium. By supplementing calcium alone, we actually harden more than our bones – calcification can occur in arteries, kidneys and other places in our bodies. Dr. Thompson reminds us throughout the book that “Calcium hardens concrete!”

Having gone into medicine with “altruistic” ideas, Dr. Thompson had become disenchanted with his profession, ready to quit. He reconsidered when in 1996 a peer-reviewed directory chose him as one of the “Best Doctors in America.” Encouraged, he decided to continue to make a difference.

Minerally Bankrupt (Chapter 1) – This foundational chapter states that bones consist of at least 12 minerals. “Excess calcium can cause:

  • Kidney and gallstones
  • Arterial plaque (and heart disease)
  • Bone spurs (joints / osteoarthritis)
  • Calcium deposits in tissues other than bones
  • Brain cell dysfunction, brain shrinkage and dementia.” (p. 9)
  • Cataracts
  • Cancer
  • Diabetis
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Hypertentension (p. 29)
  • Obesity (p. 39)
  • Migrains (p. 43)

 

“Too much calcium causes the adrenal glands to be suppressed in order for the kidneys to hold on to the necessary magnesium in an attempt to keep these two minerals in balance.” (p. 19)

 

Before the invention of refrigeration, our forefathers used sea or rock salt

to preserve food. Our natural balance of minerals left with this change. “Because a mineral ‘footprint’ is passed from mother to child, each generation has become progressively more deficient in these essential minerals.” (p. 12)

 

To add more injury to our systems, when the use of iodine in making bread and canned goods was exchanged with cheaper bromine, we began to see an increase in “thyroid disease and cancer, breast cysts, fibrous changes, cyclic tenderness and cancer, prostrate inflammation and cancer, and ovarian hormonal dysfunction, ovarian cysts, endometriosis and ovarian cancer.” (p. 13)

 

Table salt destroys health and the best mineral supplement is unrefined rock or sea salt. Dr. Thompson explains that the Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis (HMTA) gives the best possible analysis of the mineral levels and guides the medical practitioner in properly supplementing. He recommends only Trace Minerals, Inc. for doing the test.

 

Throughout the book, Dr. Thompson gives mini lessons on biochemistry that all doctors study in medical school. Amazingly, most doctors have forgotten their biochemistry and continue to follow the “Calcium Lie,” “The Calcium Myth” (chapter 2), and “The Vitamin Lie” (chapter 7).

 

Our authors devote chapters to the following health conditions and how they relate to calcium:

  • Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Calcium (chapter 3)
  • Digestive Dilemmas: Poor Protein Digestion, Sodium Deficiency and Cell Membrane Dysfunction (chapter 4)
  • Metabolic Failure How Excess Calcium Causes Weight Gain, Thyroid and Adrenal Malfunctions and Five Types of Hypothyroidism (chapter 5)
  • Women’s Issues: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Menopause (chapter 6)

Stress plays a key role in our heath. Thompson and Barnes address this issue and its relationship to Calcium (chapter 8). They emphasize that “stress management must be a regular part of a healthy life style.” (p. 176)

In chapter 9, The Road Back to Health they give their readers the following steps:

  1. Drink pure water.
  2. Take ionic sea salt – derived supplements.
  3. Whole food vitamins.
  4. Essential Fatty Acids
  5. Eat raw nuts and/or seeds daily.
  6. Eat high quality protein.
  7. Get essential monosaccharides. (p. 184-195)

The Calcium Lie II closes with chapter 10, “Doctor to Doctor: An Impassionate Plea.” He encourages his readers to copy this chapter and take to their doctors or better yet to purchase a copy of the book for their doctors.

Dr. Thompson and Kathleen Barnes present the facts behind their claims. Reading and following their guidance will improve our health.

Brain Rules by Dr. John Medina Brain Rule # 7b – Sleep Well, Think Well

Dr. John Medina continues his thoughts on Sleep in the remainder of this chapter. See Brain Rules 7a for the previous part of the chapter..

Sadly, Medina cannot answer this question definitively; How much sleep do we need? There are so many variables including: age, gender, pregnancy, puberty, etc. He proposes that a better question would be: How much sleep don’t we need? Or, at what point would the amount of sleep we get disrupt what we do during our waking hours? P. 158-169

Perhaps we should follow the example of our former president, LBJ, who apparently locked his door, changed into his pajamas during the day to take a 30 minute nap. Or maybe we should have a “siesta” during our work day as other cultures practice? Some researchers found that a 26 or 30 minute nap could increase productivity during the day and another study found that a 45 minutes nap would have the same benefit. P. 158-160

Some studies verify that Sleep Loss = Brain Drain. In one study a successful female student getting under seven hours of sleep during the week and only 40 minutes more on the weekend scored lower than standardized tests. In another study soldiers responsible for complex equipment lost 30 percent proficiency after just one lost night of sleep. After two nights of lost sleep, the lose of performance stretched to 60 percent. In yet other studies considerable loss of function was documented after less than six hours of sleep each night for five days study participants suffered loss of cognitive abilities equal to a continual 48 hour sleep deprivation. P. 162-165

Given that the USA loses $100 billion each year in productivity due to sleep deprivations,  Dr. John Medina makes the following recommendations:

  1. Match chronotypes  – since there are measurement tools to determine this, schedules can be determined by what type the individual is.
  2. Promote naps – provide time and place for naps in the work or school day.
  3. Try Sleeping on it –don’t make decisions or do important work without proper sleep. P. 165-167

Dr. John Medina summarizes Brain Rule 7 – Sleep Well, Think Well

  • “The brain is in a constant state of tension between cells and chemicals that try to put you to sleep and cells and chemicals that try to keep you awake.
  • The neurons of your brain show vigorous rhythmical activity when you’re asleep –– perhaps replaying what you learned that day.
  • Loss of sleep hurts attention, executive function, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning, and even mo

A Book Review: Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder by Karyn Seroussi

Miles Seroussi’s development began normally, but abruptly came to a halt. Early diagnosis of autism sent his mother, Karyn, on a journey of research and recovery. She found some researchers that believed autism to be a biologically based condition.

Among these researchers she learned from Bernard Rimland, PhD, Director of Autism Research Institute. He wrote the forward for this book saying that while it reads like a detective story, it accurately chronicles her family’s journey. Rimland’s book Infantile Autism published in 1964 laid to rest the pernicious theory that unloving “refrigerator” mothers caused autism. In spite of studies related to vaccinations in general and the MMR in particular, the medical establishment fails to confirm the connection in at least some situations. Further, studies regarding the benefit of Vitamin B6 for many children with autism are scoffed at or ignored by poorly informed physicians.

Karyn also learned that Paul Shattock and Karl Reichelt had identified neuropeptides. Her husband, Alan a researcher for Ortho, a division of Johnson and Johnson began a study to confirm that these neuropeptides were casomorphin and apha-gliadin with the idea of developing a routine neonatal or postnatal diagnostic test to identify autism much earlier.

In addition to these and other researchers, Karyn was doing her own work with other families, like theirs, that were doing home-based behavioral programs. Through the official research and her case studies, she found a number of factors that were true of many or some of these children in about ten families.

  1. Gluten – by using an elimination diet they discovered that in most cases their children did better without gluten.
  2. Dairy – they observed that many of the children had difficulty with dairy –especially casein, but some with lactose.
  3. Other food allergies.
  4. Yeast –many of these children had suffered from many ear / other infections and received many antibiotics – thus encouraging candida. Nystatan and / or probiotics deal with this.
  5. “Leaky gut” -all of this results in a condition that prevents nutritional absorption.
  6. Vaccinations – while Karyn did not begin with this belief she later realized that this was a factor for many.
  7. Genetics – a predisposition to a weak immune system may cause the assaults listed above to overwhelm the system and lead to autistic behaviors.

Part of what brought Seroussi to the conclusion of the genetic factor was her own health. When she listed her symptoms, she realized that they matched the symptoms of food allergy and yeast overgrowth: extreme fatigue, disorientation and “brain fog”, diarrhea and bloating, joint pain and morning stiffness, always feel cold, sleep disorder, intolerance to pain, difficulty exercising, sugar cravings, caffeine intolerance, back pain, frequent muscle spasms, clothes and shoes feel uncomfortable and restrictive.

In the second part of her book, the author presents the diet that has helped so many. Others have achieved results from different diets, however, Seroussi has produced a work that brings to light many of the factors that contribute to the condition we call autism and pervasive developmental disorder.

Confirming this journey of research and recovery led to the disqualification / discontinuing of special services before Miles went to school. As he entered kindergarten, his mother only told the teacher of his food allergies. Later, when she mentioned it to the teacher, he was amazed. Also, what every mother loves to hear, “I love you mommy,” has brought joy to this mother’s heart.