3 Ways to Help Students Achieve Success in Reading and Language

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Do you wonder why your student struggles with reading? I have spent much of my forty years of teach searching for ways to help student learn. Teaching reading has consumed most of those efforts. As you probably realize, many of our students today are missing developmental pieces and cognitive skills.

I have found that children are so very different and learning challenges do not always respond to the same interventions. However, educators across the country help students achieve success in reading and language using two Scientific Learning programs: Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant

These programs provide us with 3 ways to help our students:

  1. Build students’ cognitive skills. Cognitive (learning) skills addressed by Fast ForWord products:  memory, attention, processing rate and sequencing  Reading Skills addressed: phonological & phonemic (sound) awareness, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, decoding (sound out words), working memory (remembering long enough to do something with), syntax and grammar (structure of our language)

2. Prepare students’ brains to hear English. Once we fill in the missing pieces of development in the brain, a child can read and use the English language.

3.      Have students practice reading aloud, with support. Finally, we can provide opportunity for the children to read aloud – to other people and with Reading Assistant to the computer which provides timely correction.

You can read a blogger / inservice provider’s experience:  3 Ways to Help Struggling Readers and English Language Learners http://inservice.ascd.org/3-ways-to-help-struggling-readers-and-english-language-learners/

Over 250 studies show that Fast ForWord and Reading Assistance provides all of this for children across the country. www.scientificlearning.com/results

To learn how more about Fast ForWord  / Reading Assistant and how we use it with our students watch this video:  https://youtu.be/5BmNPJ9KdSo   Be sure and watch to the end for the special offers.

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Personal Reflections – 2017 # 20 – What have our graduates done beyond high school?

Many of our graduates have gone to college or have gone into a trade. We will feature Jered today. While in high school we attended his Eagle Scout celebration. During high school he wrote a novel (Learn to Write the Novel Way) for class: Guns at Aparri. At one point, he stated that he had received an “atta boy” for his writing skills in a report for work.

After high school, he earned a degree in criminal justice and served in the U.S. Army Reserves.  Since then he has worked for the Department of Homeland Security.  Thank you, Jered for your service to our country.

Personal Reflections – 2017 – 14 – How did “Home School / Small School” K-6 work?

For a time we had a small school in our home using the Charlotte Mason approach with elements of classical education. Part of that time, we had an unlikely “class” of almost full time instruction. Our next door neighbor’s nephew lived with them while his father drove a truck for a living. Andrew was in Kindergarten. We had another student in the 6th grade – Drew. Other students formed part of our Charlotte Mason home school learning center. Many in that group grew up with us and later graduated from Academy Northwest. Once that happened, possibly because of a downturn in the economy, our groups were in middle and high school. Those were enjoyable days.

Personal Reflections 2017 – 13 – How did we learn about the Oregon Trail and Lewis and Clark?

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Over the years we did a number of field trips that helped us understand the Oregon Trail, Lewis and Clark’s Journey of Discovery and other Pacific Northwest History highlights.  On one occasion we went to Oregon to see The Oregon Trail museum and Fort Clatsop. Further, on another occasion we stayed overnight at the Pioneer Farm closer to home. Each of these occasions provided time to bond with our families and, of course, to learn about our past. We can learn much by understanding how our home developed.

Personal Reflections 2017 – How did Academy Northwest look after 10 years of having its own graduation ceremony?

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Graduation, 2006 – Academy Northwest’s graduation program tells the story. All over Western Washington we have “learning centers” operated by Teacher Consultants. Our title, Teacher Consultants includes two of our functions. We teach classes to our students and we consult with their parents. Our model forms a triangle; each part has responsibilities and benefits.  Visit our website to see the “Family Academy Way” which illustrates how our affiliate school, Academy Northwest, operates.

The Family Academy Way

Here is an excerpt from that page:

The Family Academy Way includes, but is not limited to:

  • Learning within meaningful relationships
  • Accountability
  • Individualized learning plans
  • Professional guidance
  • Documentation of completed work (transcripts)
  • High standards (raising the bar)
  • Personalized help
  • Academic and personal excellence
  • Reinforcement of family values

 

Personal Reflections -2017 – 10 – What part do field trips and libraries play in homeschooling?

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If you ask the students, I would venture to say that field trips played a big part in their learning. Over the years we often visited the Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum and then we would go across the street to see the Botanical Conservatory. The Karpeles had rotating exhibits on many topics – always interesting and sometimes they fit right in with what we were studying. Then a stop to see exotic plants at the W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory in Wright’s Park in Tacoma topped off the day.

While our students needed to visit the public library for much of their research we did provide them with a lending library that grew over the years. When we moved to Oklahoma, much of our library found a new home in Arrow Academic Center, another Academy Northwest learning center in Bothell.

Some of our activities included a group of students and other included one-on-one studies.

Personal Reflections – 2017 – 9 – What happens when Monet, Copernicus, Newton, Bunyan, Boyle and Mozart to come to visit?

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Our students learned about different historical figures through reading biographies.  Also, they gained public speaking / acting skills. You probably notice that we had a broad range of ages, 7th – 12th, in our learning center during those years. It is great to know that biographies are available at different reading levels so each student could work on his own level and participate with the class.  Some students could have a low reading level, but still presented well in class.

Personal Reflections 2017 – 7 -How did we adjust as our learning center grew?

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After a year of using our remodeled garage as our learning center, Master Enterprises Learning Center moved into the living / dining room area.  Ronnie’s office moved into a “bedroom”.

Except for two short times in the future that is where the students met for classes.  Early on the remodeled garage was our living room, but after some time we actually lost our living room. That room was our bedroom for a while and finally Ronnie’s office. My office eventually moved into the largest “bedroom” as well, so you can see we were trying to make the most of the space we had.

After the first few years, our learning center grew to about 20 students. Some may have been taking just one class, such as Spanish or they may have been full time Academy Northwest students.

Preventing Meltdowns in Children

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Many children experience meltdowns in an academic setting and at home. Some of these children are on the autism spectrum, others are not. Finding the underlying cause helps to prevent meltdowns.

One underlying cause relates to dominance. For example, a child may have a mixed dominance – that means some information enters the system through the right ear or eye and other information enters the left ear or eye. That information goes to different parts of the brain and the individual must look for it crossing from one hemisphere to the other. While looking for the information, at the very least, he takes a very long time finding it. At the worst, he gets frustrated or melts down. When the meltdown relates to dominance the solution is to establish a one-side dominance.

Another underlying cause relates to sensory perceptions. What seems like a normal sensation, visual, auditory, tactile to us may not be for this child.  This child may have hyper auditory reactions to sounds that register in a “normal” range.  Further, a light touch may activate a violent reaction. Neurodevelopmentalists recommend activities that stimulate these senses to normalize the response.

While working on these underlying causes with a neurodevelopmentalist, one may create an environment to aid in preventing these meltdowns. Using visual strategies are especially helpful for these individuals in knowing what will happen and what will not happen as well as making good transitions.  Visual tools work well because they can overload easily with auditory input. Even though visual input usually works better than auditory, one can provide a “too busy” visual environment. Organization helps, but do not overdo it.

Visual calendars / schedules and timers can help the individual know what to expect and to change from one activity to another. You can Google “visual timers” to see the great variety of timers available. Each one will provide a unique solution for different settings. If a child needs to understand the passage of time, analog or other types will help. Digital types do not help for all needs, but one certainly needs to be able to use all kinds.

Rules or Expectations should be visually posted in age/developmentally appropriate ways. Remember the appropriate number of rules will vary for individuals. You need to post, review and refer to these rules when you correct the child. This helps the child know what to expect. Unpredictable situations set them up for meltdowns.

Linda Hodgdon, expert in this area gives, “12 Essentials Every Classroom Must Have for Autism and Asperger’s Success”. http://usevisualstrategies.com/12-essentials-every-classroom-must-have-for-autism-aspergers-success/  Do not try to implement all of these essentials all at once. Add one at a time. Starting with a personal schedule for the individual usually works best.

For more information.

Scientific Learning – Learning Accelerators

Scientific Learning’s Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant

Teach students to:

  • Distinguish sounds in words
  • Focus on reading content
  • Follow directions
  • Engage in class
  • Understand what they read
  • Read fluently

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